Controlling the malicious MOLE the organic way

September 25, 2019

NOTE: 

If you can tolerate their burrows, moles will eliminate many insect pests while aerating your soil!

...so they're not all that bad!

 

Many mistakenly believe moles kill plants by feeding on their roots, but moles actually prefer worms, grubs and other bugs.

Plant damage is a side effect of their travels through the earth. The air pockets they create around the roots of ornamental plants and flowers can cause them to dry out and die.

 

 

(Photo: www.pests.org)

 

How to control moles the organic way:

 

 

*Barriers:

Dig a trench roughly 15cm wide and 60cm deep. Fill it with rock or line it with wire to prevent burrowing pests from invading garden areas.

 

 

*Repellents:

Natural garlic repellents work well to keep burrowing animals from lawns, gardens and other planting areas. Apply when tunnels or cone shaped mounds appear in soil.

 

Product Cape Garden stock:

Mole Repellent (Efekto) @ R159.95 (100ml)

 

 

 

*Wild garlic as a mole repellent:

Tulbaghia violacea is known to discourage moles from the garden (by their strong smell).

Bonus: it also repels fleas, ticks and mosquitoes when crushed on the skin!

*Available at Cape Garden @ from R29.95

 

(Photo: Grounded Landscaping)

 

 

 

*Ultrasonic Devices:

Ultra sonic devices produce a penetrating sonic pulse that drives underground rodents crazy. Pets won’t be affected but moles find the noise irritating and move to quieter surroundings.

 

Product Cape Garden stock:

(currently waiting on new stock to arrive)

'The Solar Moler':

 

- A 100% eco friendly product. It’s powered by solar energy and is safe and easy to use. The device keeps moles and other rodents away from the garden or lawn by using both sonic and vibration technology at 30 second intervals. It’s effective for a 500 to 600 square meter area. R479.95

 

 

 

REMEMBER:

In general, moles will be attracted to your garden because of the number of insects in your soil (keep in mind that your garden is an ecosystem!) and the ease of digging through it and most species enjoy wide, open spaces to do this. 

 

 

  

(Photo: www.mnn.com)

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

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